Trappe Tavern

Trappe Tavern, c. 1910. Originally known as the Fountain Inn, this building has served as a tavern since it was built in the late 1700s. By 1823, the inn’s barn, sheds, and stables could accommodate up to 75 wagons and 150 horses. A “Big Spring” nearby provided water via underground wooden pipes to a distillery and the inn, which had three fountain pumps in the yard for watering thirsty horses. Traces of the spring remain in the pond located at nearby Rambo Park. During the tenure of Edward Beckman, from 1897 to 1930, the tavern was advertised as a “drover’s headquarters” with “first class accommodations.” (Courtesy of Jerry A. Chiccarine.)
Trappe Tavern, c. 1910. Originally known as the Fountain Inn, this building has served as a tavern since it was built in the late 1700s. By 1823, the inn’s barn, sheds, and stables could accommodate up to 75 wagons and 150 horses. A “Big Spring” nearby provided water via underground wooden pipes to a distillery and the inn, which had three fountain pumps in the yard for watering thirsty horses. Traces of the spring remain in the pond located at nearby Rambo Park. During the tenure of Edward Beckman, from 1897 to 1930, the tavern was advertised as a “drover’s headquarters” with “first class accommodations.” (Courtesy of Jerry A. Chiccarine.)

418 W. Main Street
Originally known as the Fountain Inn, this building has served
as a tavern since it was built in the late 1700s. A “Big Spring”
nearby provided water via underground wooden pipes to a
distillery and the inn, which had three fountain pumps in the
yard for watering thirsty horses. Traces of the spring remain
in the pond located at Rambo Park. By 1823, the inn’s barn,
sheds, and stables could accommodate up to 75 wagons and
150 horses. The Mingo Express Horse Company was founded
here in 1836 and continues to meet annually. Since 1989, the
tavern has served as a restaurant and bar. Open to the public